• sharonkingston

Evolving as an artist

Artists face the “wall of necessity” in the way they become identified with a style of work.  And even though commercial success may result, it is a form of imprisonment to paint from that space.  To be striving, challenging oneself and taking risks in process and product do not fit in the mold of the making work that sells–the hivelike activity that artists who wish to make a living from their work often find themselves.

As of late, I’ve been unhitiching myself from those contemplative atmospheric landscapes for which I’m identified.  And evolving, ever so slowly, into a space that is more abstract, more me and much more difficult–yet rewarding.  The paintings themselves carry in them more work and time, a host of unknowns and the process finds me “below the threshold of thought” in a space that connects the physicality of the paint with a unconscious part of  my mind.  

These words from Levi-Strauss sum up the moments when creating is at its finest.

From Levi-Strauss  When the spectrum or rainbow of human cultures has finally sunk into the void created by our frenzy; as long as we continue to exist and there is a world, that tenuous arch linking us to the inaccessible will still remain, to show us the opposite course to that leading to enslavement; man may be unable to follow it, but its contemplation affords him the only privilege of which he can make himself worthy; that of arresting the process, of controlling the impulse which forces him to block up the cracks in the wall of necessity one by one and to complete his work at the same time as he shuts himself up within his prison; this is a privilege coveted by every society, whatever its beliefs, its political system or its level of civilization; a privilege to which it attaches its leisure, its pleasure, its peace of mind and its freedom; the possibility, vital for life, of unhitching, which consists—Oh! fond farewell to savages and explorations!—in grasping, during the brief intervals in which our species can bring itself to interrupt its hive-like activity, the essence of what it was and continues to be, below the threshold of thought and over and above society: in the contemplation of a mineral more beautiful than all our creations; in the scent that can be smelt at the heart of a lily and is more imbued with learning than all our books; or in the brief glance, heavy with patience, serenity and mutual forgiveness, that, through some involuntary understanding, one can sometimes exchange with a cat.

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    SHARON KINGSTON

     

     

    studio/gallery

    open by appointment

    please call / text

    360-739-2474 or

    email sharonkingston@me.com

    ALL SALES FINAL.

    NO REFUNDS or EXCHANGES ON ORIGINAL PAINTINGS or FINE ART PRINTS and FRAMES.

    If item is damaged in transit, it will be replaced with a painting of similar style and value.

      SHARON KINGSTON STUDIO

      203 PROSPECT ST

      Bellingham WA  98225

      please send me note before you stop by

      Sharon Kingston is a Northwest WA oil painter who uses the properties of her medium to create paintings that respond to both the atmosphere of her surroundings and poetry. This method of looking inward and outward and, in the moments of painting, finding her way on the canvas is her approach to creating paintings infused with poetry and the memory of landscape. The atmospheric element of her work is a testament to her desire to create spaces that are undefined, contemplative and allow room to reflect and accept uncertainty. Poetry, by nature open ended, is used both in the conceptualization of the work and as a part of the studio practice. The words of Rainer Rilke have informed Sharon’s work for many years, but she also turns to contemporary poetry when it resonates with her life. She uses layers of transparent color, reveals forms by concealing and unearthing pentimenti and suggests elements of landscape in her process.