• sharonkingston

fog suite 2: beacon hill damask


Fog Suite 2 consists of 3 16x16" paintings on cradled board. They all began with a gold gesso to give the underpainting that glimmer and to also add a texture to the smooth surface of the board.


Beacon Hill damask is certainly the most gold of the three and the final colors of the piece do so remind me of an antique fabric.


The actual scene of the painting is again from one of my image captures of a morning on Lake Whatcom here in Bellingham.



The fog suites would not be complete without at least one poem from my beloved Rilke.

Memory

“And you wait, you wait for that one thing that will infinitely enlarge your life; the gigantic, the stupendous, the awakening of stones, depths turned round toward you. The volumes bound in rust and gold flicker dimly on the shelves; and you think of lands traveled across, of paintings, of the clothes of women found and lost. And then suddenly you know: it was then. You rise, and before you stands the fear and prayer and shape of a vanished year.” –Rainer Maria Rilke (Trans. Edward Snow)



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    SHARON KINGSTON

     

     

    studio/gallery

    open by appointment

    please call / text

    360-739-2474 or

    email sharonkingston@me.com

    ALL SALES FINAL.

    NO REFUNDS or EXCHANGES ON ORIGINAL PAINTINGS or FINE ART PRINTS and FRAMES.

    If item is damaged in transit, it will be replaced with a painting of similar style and value.

      SHARON KINGSTON STUDIO

      203 PROSPECT ST

      Bellingham WA  98225

      my studio is open by masked appointment

      please send me a text with the
      day and time you'd like to come by.
      360-7392474

      Sharon Kingston is a Northwest WA oil painter who uses the properties of her medium to create paintings that respond to both the atmosphere of her surroundings and poetry. This method of looking inward and outward and, in the moments of painting, finding her way on the canvas is her approach to creating paintings infused with poetry and the memory of landscape. The atmospheric element of her work is a testament to her desire to create spaces that are undefined, contemplative and allow room to reflect and accept uncertainty. Poetry, by nature open ended, is used both in the conceptualization of the work and as a part of the studio practice. The words of Rainer Rilke have informed Sharon’s work for many years, but she also turns to contemporary poetry when it resonates with her life. She uses layers of transparent color, reveals forms by concealing and unearthing pentimenti and suggests elements of landscape in her process.