• sharonkingston

Influenced by:

Room 7 at the Tate Modern March 2008 This was the ahhhh moment when all of my influences were shown together. I sat on the bench and pivoted from right to left from Joan Mitchell’s Number 12, to Claude Monet’s late water lily to Mark Rothko’s Untitled 1951 citrus beauty. My paintings tend to stray to dark and moody in these dark and moody days, so to combat this I’m bringing in these works to inspire the palette, composition and texture of my winter works. Looser, airier and less of a concrete/heavy suggestion of landscape yet inspired by the landscape. Something these three artists (although Rothko would deny suggestions of horizon) sought in their work. Sharon Butler just reviewed MOMA’s Abstract Expressionists New York exhibit and had this to say about it.. “Rather than offering didactic explanations for each aesthetic decision, artists may rediscover the value in enigmatic, emotionally-rooted work whose meaning is intuitively derived and not so easily explained.” Something else I’d like to keep in mind with these new paintings.

1 view

    SHARON KINGSTON

     

     

    studio/gallery

    open by appointment

    please call / text

    360-739-2474 or

    email sharonkingston@me.com

    ALL SALES FINAL.

    NO REFUNDS or EXCHANGES ON ORIGINAL PAINTINGS or FINE ART PRINTS and FRAMES.

    If item is damaged in transit, it will be replaced with a painting of similar style and value.

      SHARON KINGSTON STUDIO

      203 PROSPECT ST

      Bellingham WA  98225

      please send me note before you stop by

      Sharon Kingston is a Northwest WA oil painter who uses the properties of her medium to create paintings that respond to both the atmosphere of her surroundings and poetry. This method of looking inward and outward and, in the moments of painting, finding her way on the canvas is her approach to creating paintings infused with poetry and the memory of landscape. The atmospheric element of her work is a testament to her desire to create spaces that are undefined, contemplative and allow room to reflect and accept uncertainty. Poetry, by nature open ended, is used both in the conceptualization of the work and as a part of the studio practice. The words of Rainer Rilke have informed Sharon’s work for many years, but she also turns to contemporary poetry when it resonates with her life. She uses layers of transparent color, reveals forms by concealing and unearthing pentimenti and suggests elements of landscape in her process.