• sharonkingston

Rilke's Blue Hydrangea

The hydrangea petals are turning/fading. Seems a fitting time to share the poem by Rilke that inspired this painting,blue hydrangea.

blue hydrangea, oil on canvas, 40x40", $2000

The poem is about perception and description, about metaphor and its associative coalescings, about thematic material and its wrestle with formal limit, about mortality and renewal, about lyric self-making. More plainly, the poem is about this, too: a speaker happens onto a hydrangea plant, is moved to describe its characteristics by way of melancholy analogies, and experiences—if we see the plant’s rejuvenation as indicative of the speaker’s own—a sudden self-awareness




‘These leaves are like the last green in the paint pots—dried up, dull, and rough, behind the flowered umbels whose blue is not their own, only mirrored from far away.

In their mirror it is vague and tear-stained, as if deep down they wished to lose it; and as with blue writing paper there is yellow in them, violet and gray;

washed out as on a child’s pinafore, no longer worn things, which nothing can befall: how one feels a small life’s shortness.

But suddenly the blue seems to revive in one of the umbels, and one sees a touching blue’s rejoicing in green.’




    SHARON KINGSTON

     

     

    studio/gallery

    open by appointment

    please call / text

    360-739-2474 or

    email sharonkingston@me.com

    ALL SALES FINAL.

    NO REFUNDS or EXCHANGES ON ORIGINAL PAINTINGS or FINE ART PRINTS and FRAMES.

    If item is damaged in transit, it will be replaced with a painting of similar style and value.

      SHARON KINGSTON STUDIO

      203 PROSPECT ST

      Bellingham WA  98225

      please send me note before you stop by

      Sharon Kingston is a Northwest WA oil painter who uses the properties of her medium to create paintings that respond to both the atmosphere of her surroundings and poetry. This method of looking inward and outward and, in the moments of painting, finding her way on the canvas is her approach to creating paintings infused with poetry and the memory of landscape. The atmospheric element of her work is a testament to her desire to create spaces that are undefined, contemplative and allow room to reflect and accept uncertainty. Poetry, by nature open ended, is used both in the conceptualization of the work and as a part of the studio practice. The words of Rainer Rilke have informed Sharon’s work for many years, but she also turns to contemporary poetry when it resonates with her life. She uses layers of transparent color, reveals forms by concealing and unearthing pentimenti and suggests elements of landscape in her process.