• sharonkingston

What Painting Ought to Be

Experiencing the Poetics of Painting Audrey Flack from a talk with Robert Slutzky February 20, 1985

There is a distinction between those artists who produce marketable images, and then produce variations for that market, and those who have resisted market pressures. One stops the flow, while the other allows growth to take place. This process of growing occurs during a total involvement in the creative act. You are not just producing images, but provoking and being provoked by those images. You get involved in a metaphoric revelation, and witness metaphors emerging from the work.

The energy output in your body slows down and your fingertips cool as you contemplate your own production–a dialogue between you and your work; a total retinal involvement–until you become mesmerized and see all kinds of presences in the work.

This is the essence of the act of painting and what painting ought to be about. The ultimate achievement is a transference of that revelation from private to public.

0 views

    SHARON KINGSTON

     

     

    studio/gallery

    open by appointment

    please call / text

    360-739-2474 or

    email sharonkingston@me.com

    ALL SALES FINAL.

    NO REFUNDS or EXCHANGES ON ORIGINAL PAINTINGS or FINE ART PRINTS and FRAMES.

    If item is damaged in transit, it will be replaced with a painting of similar style and value.

    • Facebook
    • instagram
    • Pinterest - Black Circle

    SHARON KINGSTON STUDIO

    203 PROSPECT ST

    Bellingham WA  98225

    please send me note before you stop by

    Sharon Kingston is a Northwest WA oil painter who uses the properties of her medium to create paintings that respond to both the atmosphere of her surroundings and poetry. This method of looking inward and outward and, in the moments of painting, finding her way on the canvas is her approach to creating paintings infused with poetry and the memory of landscape. The atmospheric element of her work is a testament to her desire to create spaces that are undefined, contemplative and allow room to reflect and accept uncertainty. Poetry, by nature open ended, is used both in the conceptualization of the work and as a part of the studio practice. The words of Rainer Rilke have informed Sharon’s work for many years, but she also turns to contemporary poetry when it resonates with her life. She uses layers of transparent color, reveals forms by concealing and unearthing pentimenti and suggests elements of landscape in her process.