• sharonkingston

What's on the easel today, 9/10

Updated: Sep 11, 2019


I’ve been painting stormy seascapes. This is the third one in the series. They feature the colors cerulean blue French (a happy blue sky color) mixed with Portland grey (you know, that muddy PNW sky color) and the result is luscious and numinous. It’s like the storm and bliss exist in the same space—largely driven by the color and light. I love storm clouds because of the energy that is held in the form and the high contrast in tone—they really are a joy to paint and a way to be comfortable hanging in the stormy spaces. There really is a sublime beauty there. Also. The less control I feel I have over my life, the more representational I paint. Guess how much control I’m feeling these days. I've read that Gerhard Richter who famously avoids categorization has painted seascapes for over 3 decades concurrently with his large scale abstracts. He says that his representational paintings depict his yearnings and his abstracts explore his reality.




    SHARON KINGSTON

     

     

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    360-739-2474 or

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    SHARON KINGSTON STUDIO

    203 PROSPECT ST

    Bellingham WA  98225

    please send me note before you stop by

    Sharon Kingston is a Northwest WA oil painter who uses the properties of her medium to create paintings that respond to both the atmosphere of her surroundings and poetry. This method of looking inward and outward and, in the moments of painting, finding her way on the canvas is her approach to creating paintings infused with poetry and the memory of landscape. The atmospheric element of her work is a testament to her desire to create spaces that are undefined, contemplative and allow room to reflect and accept uncertainty. Poetry, by nature open ended, is used both in the conceptualization of the work and as a part of the studio practice. The words of Rainer Rilke have informed Sharon’s work for many years, but she also turns to contemporary poetry when it resonates with her life. She uses layers of transparent color, reveals forms by concealing and unearthing pentimenti and suggests elements of landscape in her process.